Mt. Tepouzan

Posted on 25. Feb, 2007 @ 2:04 pm by in Humor, Osaka, Travel Views: 3,615

I’m not even a professional mountain climber, but I climbed one of the most extreme mountains in Japan.

I didn’t even bring any equipment, and I was wearing my Adidas sneakers. It was raining.

This mountain, Mount Tempozan (天保山), at an astounding 4.53 meters, is the lowest mountain in Japan. The mountain is located in Tempozan Park in Osaka. You can read about the park and the fierce mountain on this bilingual information sign.

The perilous jagged snowy peak of Mt. Tempozan.

There is a great view of the “Big Wheel” from the mountain area.

Tempozan Park is located very close to the famous Osaka Acquarium down in the Osaka bay area, so if you’re in the area, drop by and pay Mount Tempozan a visit.

But be careful.

- Harvey

  • berz

    “bilingual information sign” link broken XD

  • http://www.japannewbie.com harvey

    Fixed! Sorry about that!

  • Clive

    Oh noes!!11!

    We went to Keiyukan aquarium (it’s awesome bTW) and somehow missed that edifice. Heh

    Next time we’ll have to stop by and take the climb.

    Harvey, do you have pics of yourself planting a flag at the summit?

  • Clive

    Harvey!

    Question for ya;
    Now that you “think” in Japanese, do you also think in metric or do you need to do conversions still?

  • http://www.japannewbie.com harvey

    Clive!

    I have never had a super solid head for numbers as it is, but now I definitely refer to height & weight and temperatures the “metric way”.

    However, I never really made the switch from speed and distance… Not sure why…

    I can’t really convert on the fly though. It’s really one or the other!

  • http://www.japannewbie.com harvey

    Clive! I do have a pic somewhere I think… but… I had a nose bleed so too embarrassed to post it. ;-)

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  • Photos on flickr

  • Sewa – Hindi and Japanese (10)
    • Japan This!: Linguistically speaking there is no basis for either connection. This is called pseudo-etymology or para-etymology. If it becomes...
    • yoshihito: siks have a word: “sewa” meaning “help, assist”, maybe the origin of the japanese word “sewa”. There...
    • The Shade: Many words are pretty much the same. Naraku in japanese has the same meaning as Narak in hindi. (i.e Hell.) There were some other words...
  • IUC in Yokohama as an Advanced Student (43)
    • Maria: Hey I was wondering, when did you hear back from IUC about getting in? I know the website says in mid-March, but how long was it for you?...
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