Hokkaido Marimokkori

Posted on 30. Nov, 2006 @ 2:10 pm by in Crazy Consumers, Humor Views: 11,725

Thanks to a friend at school I was introduced to this interesting mascot from Hokkaido.

Marimokkori!

The name is a play on words. A Marimo, is a weird algae ball found in Hokkaido.

A mokkori, is another word for, well, a mound. However, it can also be used in a way described by our favorite dictionary, ALC. If you check that definition, you can understand why the figure is… shaped… the way it is.

It’s Hokkaido’s famous marimokkori! If you pull the mokkori, he’ll shake!

You can see the wonderful marimokkori and his round mokkori displayed over the Japanese homework.

Instead of studying Japanese, pull the makkori with your fingers. Upon release, marimokkori will vibrate as his mokkori slowly returns to its initial state.

Go Hokkaido!

- Harvey

[tags]marimokkori[/tags]

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  • Sewa – Hindi and Japanese (10)
    • Japan This!: Linguistically speaking there is no basis for either connection. This is called pseudo-etymology or para-etymology. If it becomes...
    • yoshihito: siks have a word: “sewa” meaning “help, assist”, maybe the origin of the japanese word “sewa”. There...
    • The Shade: Many words are pretty much the same. Naraku in japanese has the same meaning as Narak in hindi. (i.e Hell.) There were some other words...
  • IUC in Yokohama as an Advanced Student (43)
    • Maria: Hey I was wondering, when did you hear back from IUC about getting in? I know the website says in mid-March, but how long was it for you?...
  • Help a Newbie Get Work in Japan (42)